diegohuerta:

Guelaguetza 2013 - La Calenda

(via bio-mechanic)

platanos-fritos:

BLACKboard Mexican Woodcut Prints
Twenty-seven woodcut prints created by young artists from the Centro Cultural Cimarron collective based in the Costa Chica region, Oaxaca, Mexico.
Some of the artists featured in this set are: Baltaza Castellano Melo, Elder Avila Palacio, Victor Manuel Palacios Comacho and Alberta Primitiva Hernandez Nicolas.

A great collection by young artists in Mexico.

platanos-fritos:

BLACKboard Mexican Woodcut Prints

Twenty-seven woodcut prints created by young artists from the Centro Cultural Cimarron collective based in the Costa Chica region, Oaxaca, Mexico.

Some of the artists featured in this set are: Baltaza Castellano Melo, Elder Avila Palacio, Victor Manuel Palacios Comacho and Alberta Primitiva Hernandez Nicolas.

A great collection by young artists in Mexico.

beyondvictoriana:

For this President’s Day in the United States, we’re honoring the first black president in the Americas. No, not Obama – this guy was Vicente Ramón Guerrero Saldaña, the first black and indigenous president of Mexico.  Known as the George Washington and the Abraham Lincoln of Mexico, Guerrero was a leading general in the Mexican War for Independence, and abolished slavery in 1829, forty years before Lincoln would do the same.  Not only that, but he came from the “las clases populares” aka the working classes of Mexico, and rose from there to become one of the most influential leaders in Mexican history.
Read More on BeyondVictoriana.com

It’s been a long time since I posted but I was inspired by this post in a multicultural steampunk blog.

beyondvictoriana:

For this President’s Day in the United States, we’re honoring the first black president in the Americas. No, not Obama – this guy was Vicente Ramón Guerrero Saldaña, the first black and indigenous president of Mexico.  Known as the George Washington and the Abraham Lincoln of Mexico, Guerrero was a leading general in the Mexican War for Independence, and abolished slavery in 1829, forty years before Lincoln would do the same.  Not only that, but he came from the “las clases populares” aka the working classes of Mexico, and rose from there to become one of the most influential leaders in Mexican history.

Read More on BeyondVictoriana.com

It’s been a long time since I posted but I was inspired by this post in a multicultural steampunk blog.

The Expatriate Series: The Stranger

I call Paul Strand the stranger because he arrived in Ghana and Mexico as an outsider. He photographed the people of Ghana and Mexico with a simple premise, that the similarities between all humans outweighed any differences. It was this humanism that allowed Paul Strand to capture images that transcended cultural spheres and contributed to lasting impact on the craft of modern photography.

Read More

Redes (1936) was a feature film photographed by Paul Stand. It was released as The Wave in the United States to great praise. The film followed a young fisherman forced to organize his townsmen agains the exploitation by wealth hacienda owners and entrenched political interests.

The sea was a reoccurring motif in Strands photography. The two photographs above depict the way Mexicans and Ghanaians make a living off the sea. It is not hard to imagine that the enslaved africans who were brought over to the Mexican coast would also be fishing with Mexico’s indigenous population. The mexican photograph has one solitary figure dwarfed under the long stretch of nets. Almost void of people, the photographs suggests a lack of life when the nets are out of the water. In the Ghana portrait, we see two men mending nets unaware of the camera.  

Paul Strand was in Mexico and Ghana at pivotal moments in each nation’s history. Strand visited Mexico in the years following the Mexican Revolution, often journeying to parts still in active combat with the State. In Ghana, Strand arrived at the request of President Kwame Nkrumah during the euphoric post independence years. 

The portraits of the two young men depicted above evoke a spirit of dignity and strength associated with the new regimes being established in each nation. The young Ghanaian’s powerful frame and the soiled hands and shirt of the Mexican boy allude to the physical labor that is a part of their daily reality. Yet the way the light surrounds their faces and focuses on their gaze, lifted upward, fills each photograph with a sense of hope. 

The Expatriate Series - Introduction

I started the BlackMexico blog to create a public space where I could explore and collaborate on the  topic of race and culture in Mexico. I wanted to focus on answering the question of how did the encounter between the people of Mexico and Black diaspora influence the development of the Mexican culture we see today? It was a topic that sparked my interest ever since my senior year of undergraduate study at Cornell University. Now that I created the BlackMexico blog, I have been wrestling with how to engage the material and how to present it on the web. My question is broad and the resources available to me scarce.

(Portrait of young Paul Strand by Alfred Stieglitz)

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theobsidianbutterfly:

AfroMexican women standing in front the Hotel Marin in the town of El Ciruelo, Oaxaca

theobsidianbutterfly:

AfroMexican women standing in front the Hotel Marin in the town of El Ciruelo, Oaxaca

(via neoafrican)